thejoyfulpalmers

Archive for September, 2012|Monthly archive page

Money CAN Buy Happiness: Philanthropy is Good for Business

In Uncategorized on September 12, 2012 at 2:01 pm

Grandma NaVon was a baker at the Carrousel for over 20 years. Her donuts were so good that people would travel from miles around just to get one. Into her 70’s she was still up at 3 am to make “all things that rise.”

Grandma always told me, “When you cast your bread onto the waters, it always comes back buttered.” Grandma understood bread.

As a business woman and entrepreneur, my grandmother’s “bread wisdom” has fed me in both feast and in famine, and has helped me be a more effective mother. I want to share her gift to me, with you.

Here’s grandma’s advice to business women when times are good and when times are tough, and how to knead it together to raise better, happier children.

When Your Swimmin’ in the Dough—Give! Or Money Does Buy Happiness

Business is booming, sales are coming in, and clients are Raving Fans. You’ve got it all . . . almost. We’ve all heard that money doesn’t buy happiness. But it certainly does make life easier, which might give the illusion of happiness, for a while. Eventually, though, we discover an emptiness that our business success isn’t filling.

What if what we’ve heard all these years—that money doesn’t buy happiness wasn’t actually true? What if, in fact, it can?

Check out Michael Norton’s: How to By Happiness

When you’ve got it all . . . almost, give, and receive happiness.

When You’re Hungry for Bread—Give! Or Bring Home the Butter

Business is floundering, the books are more red than black, and problems are breeding like rabbits. Or, maybe it’s not as bad as that. Either way, you’re in the famine. One key principle to progress is to open the door to increase through giving. This is a universal law that we’re familiar with in one way or another.

My friend, and financial coach, Janine Bolon says, “Depending on our religious or cultural backgrounds we might have heard it described as:

  • “The Law of Cause and Effect”
  • “The Law of the Harvest”
  • “What you sow, that you shall reap.”
  • “What goes around comes around.”
  • “Birds of a feather flock together.”
  • “To him that has, more shall be given.”
  • “Like begets like.”
  • “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”
  • Or, as grandma says, “When you cast your bread onto the waters, it always comes back buttered.”

There is a misconception in our society that when we’re short of money the best thing to do is hold on tight to what we’ve got.

Janine broke this misconception for me when she taught me that money actually flows through the Universe.

“Simply put, money is not static. If you accept this one universal principle, that money flows, you are on your way to understanding wealth accumulation.

“There are three firmly entwined arms that comprise the cycle of money. These three elements keep money moving through the Universe. If at any time all three are not being implemented, you’ll see a break in the flow of money into and through your life . . . The three arms that determine the flow of money are Living, Saving, and Giving.” (Janine Bolon, Money . . . It’s Not Just For Rich People, Janine Bolon, 2005, 50.)

Philanthropy is a critical element to the flow of wealth into our lives. If we have any intention of improving our financial health in any degree, we simply cannot afford to fear or ignore the principle of giving.

When we come to genuinely adopt the value of philanthropy, regardless of our abundance or want, in business and in life we’ll find that our cup and store are filled, often to overflowing.

Business is not only about bringing home the bacon, it’s also a magnified opportunity to bring home the butter.

To Raise a Child’s Heart—Give! Or Add a Little Leavening

Let me share a story about a little leven added to some little hearts.

During our first Maggie’s Month we received a letter in the mail that said,

“Dear Maggie,

“When we got the email from your mom we all looked at your website and then gathered as a family to talk about it. We all voted to do something, but it was difficult to decide what. We had so many ideas, but Mom and Dad were worried about time.

“Finally, the idea was proposed that we give you the money in our swing set savings bucket. For the past few years we have kept a 5-gallon bucket that we put all our spare change in in hopes of saving enough money to buy a swing set. If you get all your treatments, maybe you will be able to play on a swing set some day.

“We know the Lord will bless us for helping you and maybe we can build a swing set as a family project. We are praying for you.”

Read this original story HERE. Read about Little Sam’s Gift HERE.

It isn’t hard to imagine the growth that happened in these children’s hearts as they jointly decided to delay their long-desired dream of a swing set for the benefit of another. The lessons learned, memories shared, and character built through this experience were incalculable, and priceless.

A Family Working Together to Make a Difference

As children, our character and our worldview are largely created through our family culture. Thus, adult philanthropists who are full of hope and abundance, who are healing society, and who are generally happier, more successful people more likely came from homes that practiced philanthropy.

Family philanthropy projects are deposits into the character and happiness of our children. Children learn by watching and participating. They might only be adding pennies toward a particular cause, but don’t underestimate the priceless value of those pennies as a generation of philanthropists is raised.

Bottom line, philanthropy is good for our pocketbooks, our neighborhoods, community and world. And, it’s good for our hearts.

Adopt a family philanthropic cause and you’ll sprinkle some leaven into that batch of hearts you’re raising.

Spread the Good Bread—Give! Or Feed a Hungry World

As a business you have a unique vehicle to spread goodness in a world full of serious hurting and deep needs, effect change at a grass roots level, and leverage your own philanthropic work by inspiring others to engage in philanthropy too.

The vision? “One person can’t do everything, but everyone can do something!”

Consider having your business adopt a particular cause that you’re fired up about, like cleft palate surgeries, or clean water, or seeding a high schooler’s business idea, or Maggie’s Month. Make it an annual project of your business, find a way to include your employees, and support that project. To leverage your effect, create a campaign during a certain time of the year where you encourage your clients, patients, or database to engage in philanthropy by supporting your cause, or find one of their own to support during your campaign. Educate them on the value of philanthropy for individuals and families. You are welcome to use any of the materials developed by Maggie’s Month for this purpose.

Learn more about Maggie’s Month: A Family Philanthropic Project HERE.

You’ll love our video: A Horse and a Butterfly.

Find all our Saddle Up For Maggie, Learning For Maggie, and Baking For Maggie event’s HERE.

Consider adopting Maggie as your business’s annual philanthropic project. See our Maggie’s Month Adoption Page HERE.

Like Maggie’s Month on Facebook HERE.

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AMAZING Video: A Horse and a Butterfly

In Uncategorized on September 2, 2012 at 11:43 pm

I feel like a kid that want’s mom to put their art work on the fridge, because they feel so proud of it, and because they want everyone to see it.

It’s just the honest truth.

I’m so happy with how our video invitation of Saddle Up For Maggie turned out.

Hey, I’m a mom! I’m going to post this on my own darn virtual fridge!

I hope you enjoy watching as much as I have enjoyed watching it–for the hundredth time.

Check out our amazing Maggie’s Month events coming up HERE.

How to Grow Your Family’s Heart

In Uncategorized on September 2, 2012 at 11:21 pm

“All the Whos down in Whoville liked Christmas a lot, But the Grinch, who lived just north of Whoville, did not. The Grinch hated Christmas ó the whole Christmas season. Oh, please don’t ask why, no one quite knows the reason. It could be, perhaps, that his shoes were too tight. Or maybe his head wasn’t screwed on just right. But I think that the best reason of all May have been that his heart was two sizes too small.”

Dr. Seuss

Our daughter, Maggie has severe cerebral palsy. Her needs are financially heavier than Doug and I can carry alone. As we considered the problem of the quality of our daughters life, our financial resources, and the large, gaping chasm in between we had a stroke of genius.

Actually, it wasn’t our genius, it was God’s. And it was genius because it not only would help us meet Maggie’s needs, it would help us move forward another cause we felt deeply about—making the world a better place.

Maggie’s Month is a Family Philanthropy Project.

We thought a lot about using that word “philanthropy” to describe the heart of Maggie’s Month. Just because philanthropy sounds like something that only applies to wealthy people who get their names on museums, hospital buildings, and symphony halls.

We wanted Maggie’s Month to be more than just about our daughter Maggie. We wanted Maggie’s Month to represent a solution to a world full of serious hurting and deep needs.

The solution?

A Family Working Together to Make a Difference

. . . More people that have Philanthropy in their hearts.

Philanthropy is simply a big word for turning care and concern into action.

So, we decided that philanthropy was actually the perfect word to represent our greater hope for Maggie’s Month.

One of the Palmer Family Mantras is, “One person can’t do everything, but everyone can do something!” We want to inspire other families to take action on something they care about, respond to a need they see, and support a cause that matters to them as a regular part of their family culture.

Maggie’s Month is simply one opportunity for a family to work together to make a big difference for another person, and discover how good it feels.

Philanthropy makes us better, happier people. Science say’s it’s so, but more importantly, experience bears it out.

Michael Norton: How To Buy Happiness

Philanthropy simply follows the Law of Cause and Effect. My friend, and financial coach, Janine Bolon says, “Depending on our religious or cultural backgrounds we might have heard it described as:

“The Law of Cause and Effect”

“The Law of the Harvest”

“What you sow, that you shall reap.”

“What goes around comes around.”

“Birds of a feather flock together.”

“To him that has, more shall be given.”

“Like begets like.”

“Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”

We simply can’t do good and not have it affect us for good, both inside and out.

Try an experiment of your own. Next time you’re feeling depressed, afraid, victimized, or suffering from a scarcity mentality determine to reach out and help someone. Plant the seed and see for yourself what kind of fruit it bears.

“And what happened then…?
Well…in Who-ville they say
That the Grinch’s small heart
Grew three sizes that day!”

But Why FAMILY Philanthropy?

Let me share the “why” with a story.

During our first Maggie’s Month we received a letter in the mail that said,

“Dear Maggie,

“When we got the email from your mom we all looked at your website and then gathered as a family to talk about it. We all voted to do something, but it was difficult to decide what. We had so many ideas, but Mom and Dad were worried about time.

“Finally, the idea was proposed that we give you the money in our swing set savings bucket. For the past few years we have kept a 5-gallon bucket that we put all our spare change in in hopes of saving enough money to buy a swing set. If you get all your treatments, maybe you will be able to play on a swing set some day.

“We know the Lord will bless us for helping you and maybe we can build a swing set as a family project. We are praying for you.”

Read this original story HERE. Read about Little Sam’s Gift HERE.

It isn’t hard to imagine the growth that happened in these children’s hearts as they jointly decided to delay their long-desired dream of a swing set for the benefit of another. The lessons learned, memories shared, and character built through this experience were incalculable, and priceless.

As children, our character and our worldview are largely created through our family culture. Thus, adult philanthropists who are full of hope and abundance, who are healing society, and who are generally happier, more successful people more likely came from homes that practiced philanthropy.

Children learn by watching and participating. Parents can multiply their efforts, and their long-term impact for good by engaging their whole family in philanthropic work.

Family philanthropy projects are deposits into the character and happiness of our children. Children might only be adding pennies toward a particular cause, but don’t underestimate the priceless value of those pennies as a generation of philanthropists is raised.

Bottom line, philanthropy is good for our neighborhoods, community and world. And, it’s good for our hearts.

“Give said the little stream, give o give, give o give. Give said the little stream as it hurried down the hill. I’m small I know but wherever I go the grass grows greener still. Singing, singing all the day, give away o give away. Singing, singing all the day, give o give away.”

We hope that Maggie’s Month will become one of your family’s favorite annual philanthropic projects.

But more importantly, we hope that your family will find the joy that comes in becoming regular philanthropists. Dr. Seuss knew what he was talking about . . . you’re heart will grow three times as well.

Read more about Family Philanthropy HERE.

Check out our Maggie’s Month events HERE.

As you grow older you will discover
that you have two hands.
One for helping yourself,
the other for helping others.

Abraham Lincoln